English  Japanese 

New Rules, Food Rules. What Should I Eat?

 

Organic food

This book titled "Food Rules" by Michael Pollan opened my eyes. We all know that we need to be careful about processed foods. But Food marketers are always coming up with new ideas. So what we can do is to follow these simple rules, such as "Avoid food products that make health claims" It is because "For a product to carry a health claim on its package, it must first have a package, so right off the bat it's more likely to be a processed rather than a whole food." So true. Another rule is "Avoid food products containing ingredients that no ordinary human would keep in the pantry." Here are some other rules;

#11 Avoid foods you see advertised on television.

Food marketers are ingenious at turning criticisms of their products—and rules like these—into new ways to sell slightly different versions of the same processed foods: They simply reformulate (to be low-fat, have no HFCS or transfats, or to contain fewer ingredients) and then boast about their implied healthfulness, whether the boast is meaningful or not. The best way to escape these marketing ploys is to tune out the marketing itself, by refusing to buy heavily promoted foods. Only the biggest food manufacturers can afford to advertise their products on television: More than two thirds of food advertising is spent promoting processed foods (and alcohol), so if you avoid products with big ad budgets, you’ll automatically be avoiding edible foodlike substances. As for the 5 percent of food ads that promote whole foods (the prune or walnut growers or the beef ranchers), common sense will, one hopes, keep you from tarring them with the same brush—these are the exceptions that prove the rule.

#19 If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.

#36 Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of the milk.

This should go without saying. Such cereals are highly processed and full of refined carbohydrates as well as chemical additives.

organic food rules

#39 Eat all the junk food you want as long as you cook it yourself.

There is nothing wrong with eating sweets, fried foods, pastries, even drinking soda every now and then, but food manufacturers have made eating these formerly expensive and hard-to-make treats so cheap and easy that we’re eating them every day. The french fry did not become America’s most popular vegetable until industry took over the jobs of washing, peeling, cutting, and frying the potatoes—and cleaning up the mess. If you made all the french fries you ate, you would eat them much less often, if only because they’re so much work. The same holds true for fried chicken, chips, cakes, pies, and ice cream. Enjoy these treats as often as you’re willing to prepare them—chances are good it won’t be every day.

And finally hilarious one;

#20 It's not food if it arrived through the window of your car.

Eat organic, buy organic baby clothes




Sckoon
Aly Sanger

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.

0 comments


  • Everything you need to know about reusable cloth menstrual pads

    by Sckoon.com • November 2016

    If you are considering switching for your health and the health of our environment, read on and learn everything you need to know about using reusable cloth menstrual pads. Read More
  • Why Menstrual Cups Are Better For Your Body Then Tampons

    by Sckoon.com • October 2016

    When many are asked if they know what the tampons they are wearing have been manufactured from, some guess cotton but most folks simply do not know.  Unfortunately, the majority of tampons are NOT made of only cotton or organic material. Are you wondering if there is a better way yet? Read More
  • Are Menstrual Cups Safe to Use?

    by Sckoon.com • October 2016

    It is normal to feel cautious whenever we try something new – especially if it’s something we are using in our bodies.   Menstrual cups are very safe to use as it is worn inside the vagina during menstruation.  Unlike tampons and pads which absorb your menstrual fluids, a menstrual cup collects the fluid.   Read More